top of page

My Site 11 Group

Public·8 members
Dylan Smith
Dylan Smith

Oracle 9i Database for Windows XP: A Complete Guide to Downloading and Installing


How to Download and Install Oracle 9i Database on Windows XP




If you are looking for a reliable, scalable, and secure database platform for your applications, you might want to consider Oracle 9i Database. Oracle 9i Database is a full-featured relational database management system that offers many advanced features for online transaction processing, data warehousing, business intelligence, and e-business integration. In this article, we will show you how to download and install Oracle 9i Database on Windows XP, a popular operating system that is still widely used by many users and developers.




download oracle 9i database windows xp



Introduction




Oracle 9i Database is the ninth major release of Oracle's flagship database product, which was first launched in 1979. Oracle 9i Database was released in 2001 and introduced many new features and enhancements, such as:


  • Real Application Clusters, which enable applications to exploit cluster database availability, scalability, and performance with no application modifications.



  • Partitioning of Applications, which allow applications to treat Oracle 9i Real Application Clusters as a single system without needing to modify or partition applications.



  • Fast Split Partitioning, which improves the performance and manageability of partitioned tables by reusing existing segments when splitting partitions.



  • Shared Server, which improves the scalability of applications and concurrent clients connected to the server by reducing memory usage and process overhead.



  • Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) and Data Mining, which provide ground-breaking new functionality for analyzing and discovering patterns in large volumes of data.



  • MERGE Statement, which allows inserting, updating, or deleting data from a table based on the results of a join with another table.



  • Multitable Inserts, which allow inserting data into multiple tables with a single SQL statement.



  • External Tables, which allow querying data from flat files as if they were tables in the database.



To install Oracle 9i Database on Windows XP, you need to meet the following system requirements and prerequisites:


  • A computer with an Intel Pentium or compatible processor running at 300 MHz or higher.



  • At least 256 MB of RAM (512 MB recommended).



  • At least 3 GB of free disk space (4 GB recommended).



  • A CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.



  • A network adapter card.



  • A monitor with a resolution of at least 800 x 600 pixels (1024 x 768 recommended).



  • A mouse or other pointing device.



  • Windows XP Professional or Home Edition with Service Pack 1 or later.



  • The latest version of Microsoft Internet Explorer.



  • The latest version of Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC).



Downloading Oracle 9i Database Software




To download Oracle 9i Database software, you have two options:


  • You can request the software from Oracle Support by creating a non-technical media request service request (SR) on My Oracle Support. You will need to provide your customer support identifier (CSI), your contact information, your shipping address , and the product name and version that you want to download. Oracle Support will then send you the software on CDs or DVDs by mail. This option may take several days or weeks depending on your location and availability of the software.



  • You can download the software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud, a web-based service that allows you to download Oracle software products electronically. You will need to create an Oracle account and accept the license agreement before you can access the software. You can then search for the product name and version that you want to download and select the platform (Windows) and language that you prefer. You will see a list of files that you need to download, which are compressed in ZIP format. You can use any download manager or browser to download the files. This option may be faster and more convenient than requesting the software from Oracle Support, but it requires a high-speed internet connection and enough disk space to store the downloaded files.



For this article, we will assume that you have downloaded the software from Oracle Software Delivery Cloud. The files that you need to download are:


File NameSizeDescription


ship_9204_win32_disk1.zip623 MBThe first disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk2.zip623 MBThe second disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk3.zip623 MBThe third disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk4.zip623 MBThe fourth disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk5.zip623 MBThe fifth disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk6.zip623 MBThe sixth disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk7.zip623 MBThe seventh disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk8.zip623 MBThe eighth disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


ship_9204_win32_disk9.zip623 MBThe ninth disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit.


p4163445_92070_WINNT.zip113 MBThe patch set for Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.7) for Windows NT/2000/XP.


p5901881_92080_WINNT.zip117 MBThe patch set for Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.8) for Windows NT/2000/XP.


Total size:


6,352 MB


After you have downloaded all the files, you need to verify the integrity of the files by comparing their checksums with the ones provided by Oracle Software Delivery Cloud. A checksum is a unique value that is calculated from the contents of a file and can be used to detect any corruption or modification of the file during transmission or storage. You can use any checksum utility or tool to generate and compare the checksums of the files, such as MD5, SHA-1, or CRC-32.


To verify the checksums of the files, follow these steps: - Open the checksum utility or tool of your choice and select the file that you want to verify. - Generate the checksum of the file using the algorithm that matches the one provided by Oracle Software Delivery Cloud (MD5, SHA-1, or CRC-32). - Compare the checksum of the file with the one provided by Oracle Software Delivery Cloud and make sure they are identical. If they are not, it means that the file is corrupted or tampered with and you need to download it again. - Repeat the steps for all the files that you have downloaded. Installing Oracle 9i Database Software




After you have verified the integrity of the files, you need to extract them to a temporary location on your hard drive. You can use any compression or extraction tool to unzip the files, such as WinZip, WinRAR, or 7-Zip. You should have a total of nine folders named Disk1, Disk2, ..., Disk9, each containing several files and subfolders.


To install Oracle 9i Database software, follow these steps:


  • Log on to your computer as a user who belongs to the Administrators group.



  • Disable any antivirus software or firewall software that may interfere with the installation process.



  • Insert the first disk of Oracle 9i Database Release 2 (9.2.0.4) Enterprise Edition for Windows 32-bit (Disk1) into your CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive. If you have extracted the files to a temporary location on your hard drive, navigate to that location and open the Disk1 folder.



  • Double-click the setup.exe file to launch the Oracle Universal Installer (OUI), a graphical user interface that guides you through the installation process.



  • The OUI will perform some checks on your system and display the Welcome screen. Click Next to continue.



  • The OUI will prompt you to enter your name and company name. Enter the information and click Next.



  • The OUI will display the File Locations screen, where you can specify the source and destination paths for the installation. The source path should point to the location of Disk1, either on your CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive or on your hard drive. The destination path should point to an empty folder on your hard drive where you want to install Oracle 9i Database software. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The OUI will display the Available Products screen, where you can select the products that you want to install. Select Oracle 9i Database 9.2.0.4.0 and click Next.



  • The OUI will display the Installation Types screen, where you can choose between three types of installation: Typical, Minimal, or Custom. Typical installs all components of Oracle 9i Database Enterprise Edition with default settings and options. Minimal installs only essential components of Oracle 9i Database Enterprise Edition with default settings and options. Custom allows you to select individual components and options of Oracle 9i Database Enterprise Edition and customize their settings and options. For this article, we will choose Typical and click Next.



  • The OUI will display the Summary screen, where you can review the information and settings for the installation. Click Install to start the installation.



  • The OUI will copy and configure the files for Oracle 9i Database software. You may be prompted to insert other disks during this process. If you have extracted the files to a temporary location on your hard drive, you need to browse to that location and select the appropriate disk folder when prompted.



  • When the installation is complete, the OUI will display the End of Installation screen. Click Exit to close the OUI.



Congratulations! You have successfully installed Oracle 9i Database software on your Windows XP computer.


Creating and Configuring a Starter Database




After installing Oracle 9i Database software, you need to create and configure a starter database that you can use for your applications. A starter database is a preconfigured database that contains basic settings and options for common tasks and scenarios. You can use Database Configuration Assistant (DBCA), a graphical user interface that guides you through the creation and configuration of a starter database. You can also use command-line tools or scripts to create and configure a custom database, but that is beyond the scope of this article.


To create and configure a starter database, follow these steps:


  • Log on to your computer as a user who belongs to the Administrators group and the ORA_DBA group.



  • Open the Start menu and select Programs > Oracle - OraHome92 > Configuration and Migration Tools > Database Configuration Assistant.



  • The DBCA will perform some checks on your system and display the Welcome screen. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Operations screen, where you can choose between three operations: Create a Database, Configure Database Options, or Delete a Database. Select Create a Database and click Next.



  • The DBCA will display the Database Templates screen, where you can choose between four templates: General Purpose, Data Warehouse, Online Transaction Processing (OLTP), or Custom. Each template contains predefined settings and options for different types of databases. For this article, we will choose General Purpose and click Next.



  • The DBCA will display the Database Identification screen, where you can specify the global database name and the system identifier (SID) for your database. The global database name is a unique name that identifies your database in a network environment. It consists of a database name and a domain name, separated by a dot. For example, orcl.example.com. The SID is a unique name that identifies your database instance on your computer. It can be up to eight characters long and must start with a letter. For example, orcl. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Management Options screen, where you can enable or disable various management features for your database, such as Enterprise Manager, Automatic Undo Management, Automatic Storage Management, Recovery Manager, and Flashback Database. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Database File Locations screen, where you can specify the locations for storing your database files, such as data files, control files, redo log files, archive log files, and initialization parameter file. You can choose between two options: Use Database File Locations from Template or Use Common Location for All Database Files. The first option uses the locations specified in the template that you selected earlier. The second option allows you to specify a common location for all database files. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Recovery Configuration screen, where you can enable or disable archiving mode and specify a location for storing archive log files. Archiving mode is a mode of operation that allows you to recover your database from any point in time by saving copies of redo log files before they are overwritten. Archive log files are files that contain copies of redo log files. You can choose between two options: No Archiving Mode or Archiving Mode Enabled. The first option disables archiving mode and does not require any location for archive log files. The second option enables archiving mode and requires you to specify a location for archive log files. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Database Content screen, where you can select the components and schemas that you want to include in your database. Components are optional features that provide additional functionality for your database, such as Oracle Text, Oracle Spatial, Oracle interMedia, etc. Schemas are predefined user accounts that own objects related to specific components or applications, such as SCOTT, HR, OE, etc. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Initialization Parameters screen, where you can modify various parameters that control the behavior and performance of your database, such as memory allocation, process limits, character sets, etc. You can use the default values or change them as per your preference. Click Next to continue.



  • The DBCA will display the Creation Options screen, where you can choose between two options: Create Database or Save as a Database Template. The first option creates the database immediately using the settings and options that you specified earlier. The second option saves the settings and options as a template that you can use later to create a database with the same configuration. For this article, we will choose Create Database and click Finish.



  • The DBCA will display the Summary screen, where you can review the information and settings for creating the database. Click OK to start creating the database.



  • The DBCA will create and configure the database according to your specifications. You may be prompted to enter passwords for some schemas during this process. Enter the passwords and click OK to continue.



  • When the database creation is complete, the DBCA will display the Database Creation Results screen, where you can see the details and status of the database creation. Click Exit to close the DBCA.



Congratulations! You have successfully created and configured a starter database on your Windows XP computer.


Setting Additional Startup Parameters and Creating a Server Parameter File




After creating and configuring a starter database, you may want to set some additional startup parameters and create a server parameter file for your database. Startup parameters are settings that control the behavior and performance of your database instance, such as memory allocation, process limits, character sets, etc. A server parameter file is a binary file that stores the startup parameters for your database instance and can be modified dynamically without restarting the instance. A server parameter file is recommended over a traditional text-based initialization parameter file because it offers more flexibility and security.


To set additional startup parameters and create a server parameter file, follow these steps:


  • Log on to your computer as a user who belongs to the Administrators group and the ORA_DBA group.



  • Open the Start menu and select Programs > Oracle - OraHome92 > Application Development > SQL Plus.



  • The SQL*Plus window will open. Enter your username and password to connect to your database as SYSDBA. For example, enter SYS as SYSDBA for the username and enter the password that you specified during the database creation.



  • The SQL*Plus prompt will appear. Enter the following command to show the current startup parameters for your database instance: SHOW PARAMETERS;



  • The SQL*Plus window will display the current startup parameters for your database instance. You can scroll through the list and see the name, value, description, and scope of each parameter. You can also use the following command to show a specific parameter: SHOW PARAMETER parameter_name;



  • To change the value of a startup parameter, you can use the following command: ALTER SYSTEM SET parameter_name = value SCOPE = scope; The scope can be MEMORY, SPFILE, or BOTH. MEMORY means that the change will take effect immediately in memory but will not persist across instance restarts. SPFILE means that the change will be written to the server parameter file but will not take effect until the next instance restart. BOTH means that the change will take effect in both memory and server parameter file.



  • For example, to change the value of the SHARED_POOL_SIZE parameter to 100 MB in both memory and server parameter file, you can use the following command: ALTER SYSTEM SET SHARED_POOL_SIZE = 100M SCOPE = BOTH;



  • To create a server parameter file from your current startup parameters, you can use the following command: CREATE SPFILE FROM PFILE; This command will create a server parameter file named spfile.ora in the same location as your initialization parameter file named init.ora. For example, if your SID is orcl, the command will create a server parameter file named spfileorcl.ora in the same location as your initialization parameter file named initorcl.ora.



  • To use the server parameter file instead of the initialization parameter file for starting your database instance, you need to modify the registry entry for your Oracle service. Open the Start menu and select Run. Enter regedit and click OK.



The Registry Editor window w


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page